Monthly Archives: April 2011

Simulating Inheritance

We’ve been doing some cutting edge JavaScript stuff at BigDoor. Here are some JavaScript patterns we’ve discussed.

Mike Koss writes in Object Oriented Javascript

“A new JavaScript class is defined by creating a simple function. When a function is called with the new operator, the function serves as the constructor for that class. Internally, JavaScript creates an Object, and then calls the constructor function.”

Functions are objects with other member functions and data fields. Function objects have prototypes that can be used sort of like parent classes, but in a very different manner than other object oriented languages. If you actually want to simulate inheritance, here are some patterns to follow:

One common problem with the “extend” approach is performance. Creating a new instance requires making a copy of another object, which can slow. Also, you want to make sure your library preserves the prototype chain, so that the instanceof operator works how you’d expect it.

If you’re cognizant of how prototypes work (your code expects the prototype to be shared), a simple prototype based approach may be better. Here’s a lightweight example of a prototype based implementation. This will be more performant because descendant instances share the same prototype (If you just assign an object to the prototype you get O(1) time instead of O(N) time for the copy loop).

function MyBaseClass() {}

function MyClass() {
    MyBaseClass.call(this); // call base class constructor
}

MyClass.prototype = new MyBaseClass();

See more examples in this GitHub Gist.

Seattle Python Interest Group Meets At BigDoor

Last night BigDoor hosted the Seattle Python Interest Group (SeaPIG) meetup – despite the rainy night we had a great turnout! Our CTO Jeff Malek spoke for a few minutes and a some of our awesome developers (the three Brian’s and Collin) took part in the discussion that ranged from last month’s PyCon, to NoSQL Databases to a lively discussion about Reputation Systems. Thanks to Mike O. for letting us be involved.

In true startup form the event didn’t go off without a minor hitch, a last minute venue change to a less than polished space, but the BigDoor team pitched in and helped make things nice for our Python enthusiasts. Thanks to Charlotte, Sung, Beck, Collin, Harley and Tommy for their help. A nice shot, left, of everyone’s hard work before the event was underway.

BigDoor Announces The Engagement Economy At Ad: Tech

Today our Co-Founder and CEO Keith Smith and our Director of Monetization and Implementation Tommy Lee are attending Ad:Tech San Francisco. We’re really excited to announce the launch of the BigDoor Engagement Economy with Cost Per Quest! The BigDoor Engagement Economy is a new way for sites to engage their users while monetizing their content. One of the initial pieces is Cost Per Quest, an entirely new, performance based, ad format meant to reward end users for their time and attention while engaging deeply with online brands. Quests are a critical component of BigDoor’s Engagement Economy and are sold to advertisers on a Cost Per Quest (CPQ) basis.

The BigDoor Engagement Economy is currently in private beta mode. Last week, in partnership with SpectrumDNA Quests launched with UGO Entertainment. The incredible team at SpectrumDNA worked their magic and has truly created a gamified experience that’s intrinsically a social loyalty program incorporating interaction with news and information, as well as a rewards system that is original, native and meaningful.

We talk to websites all the time and get the question about our rumored “hidden fees.” We truly believe gamification should be a profit-center for web publishers and app developers, not a cost-center so we offer our technology for free. However, in order to provide publishers a free platform as well as enable them to make money by using gamification, we realize we need a solution that works not only for publishers and end-users, but also for advertisers as well. We think that any solution that gives advertisers traffic, can make publishers money, and reward users can be an Epic Win! The BigDoor Engagement Economy will roll out to a broader network of publishers by Summer 2011.

Online website owners interested in learning more about our Engagement Economy and Cost Per Quest advertising pilot program can contact us. Additionally, those attending San Francisco’s ad:tech 2011 are encouraged to meet with Keith Smith (keith@bigdoor.com; @ChiefDoorman) and Tommy Lee (tommy@bigdoor.com; @pikopoki) during the event, April 11-13, 2011.

BigDoor Announces the Monetization of Gamification

Engagement Economy provides traffic for advertisers, revenue for publishers and rewards for users

SEATTLE, WA – April 11, 2011 – BigDoor, the free gamification platform that increases user engagement, loyalty and monetization, today announced the launch of the BigDoor Engagement Economy, a way for sites to engage their users while monetizing their content. BigDoor provides website owners with a branded virtual currency that serves as a conduit for user rewards. Quests are a critical component of BigDoor’s Engagement Economy and are sold to advertisers on a Cost Per Quest (CPQ) basis. CPQ offers an entirely new, performance based, ad format meant to reward end users for their time and attention while engaging deeply with online brands.

Cost Per Quest (CPQ) increases revenue for websites by implementing directed engagement tasks that are driven by user rewards. BigDoor’s Engagement Economy allows advertisers to create a series of social tasks that direct users to visit multiple sites and engage them more deeply across their brand by employing gamification techniques. The user earns rewards, including badges, virtual currency and discounts, for completing quests.

“Gamification should be a profit center and not a cost center,” said Keith Smith, BigDoor Co-Founder and CEO. “Quests are the first step in the Engagement Economy that brings advertisers, publishers and users together through an engaging game layer.”

“We’ve proven that we can provide a simple, five minute process to gamify any site; now we’re taking gamification one step further with Cost Per Quest,” said Tommy Lee, BigDoor Director of Monetization and Implementation. “The BigDoor Engagement Economy offers website owners a self-service option with a built-in revenue stream that is completely customizable. We’re excited to begin rolling out these services to our current publishers and eventually beyond to a wider network.”

The BigDoor Engagement Economy is currently in private beta. Last week, the company launched Quests with SpectrumDNA (http://spectrumdna.com/) and UGO Entertainment (http://www.ugo.com/). Quests offers visitors to UGO.com a unique gamified news and information consumption experience. The BigDoor Engagement Economy will roll out to a broader network of publishers by Summer 2011.

From sports enthusiast sites to financial and entertainment news sites, over 250 online community owners, publishers, marketers and content owners are currently utilizing BigDoor’s free gamification platform, including:

• AccuScore.com
• BuddyTV
• DevHub.com
• Golfmagic.com
• ewallstreeter.com
• Filmorbit.com
• HighKudos
• INFOtainment News
• Myfreebeez
• MySportsIQ
• Outdoorsmagic.com
• Rounds
• SocialDuels
• Splore.com
• Techstars Seattle
• TheTechScoop.net

Online website owners interested in learning more about BigDoor’s Engagement Economy and Cost Per Quest advertising pilot program can contact BigDoor, http://www.bigdoor.com/contact/. Additionally, those attending San Francisco’s Ad:Tech 2011 are encouraged to meet with Keith Smith (@ChiefDoorman) and Tommy Lee (@pikopoki) during the event, April 11-13, 2011.

About BigDoor
BigDoor’s gamification platform helps companies increase their traffic and revenue through social rewards. The BigDoor platform is free to use and is available now. For more information, visit www.bigdoor.com or follow us on Twitter @bigdoormedia and @ChiefDoorman.

Contact:
Carrie Peters, BigDoor
206-579-3804
carrie@bigdoor.com

Six Tips To Gamify Your Blog

The incredibly awesome Adam Loving has graciously penned another blog post for us! We’re happy to share more of Adam’s thoughts around gamification. This post is for all you bloggers out there:

Imagine I wanted to gamify my blog. Visitors to my blog want to learn something and earn recognition (maybe in a link back to themselves). I want visitors to:

1. Read my stuff
2. Comment
3. Sign up for my email list
4. Follow me on Twitter (or friend me on LinkedIn and Facebook)
5. Promote (Tweet) my stuff

So, I would gamify my (or any) blog by adding…

1. Photos for the most recent visitors – like feedjit.com“click here to sign in and add your photo” (mybloglog pioneered this). Ideally, with inline “follow” buttons.

2. A leaderboard for commenters (including number of comments per week) with a link to their site.

3. A leaderboard for sharer’s (including number of referrals per week).

4. Segment free content from premium content (I’d create levels) – where premium content could be earned by commenting or sharing.

5. Include “reader of the week” as a featured link or special section.

6. Some kind of widget (a badge maybe but something that makes sense for your blog) that readers can earn and easily install on their site.

Finally, I’d offer The BigDoor MiniBar as an excellent start to gamify your blog. The company goes through weekly iterations and recently launched a feature that lets you customize the names of the buttons on your toolbar. As a blogger I think it’s a pretty cool feature; the more your toolbar reflects your site’s personality and your player’s desires, the better the gamification!

-Adam Loving (@adamloving)